ID Tag Guide

A Guide to Your Dog’s ID Tag

Getting your dog an ID Tag is one of the first and more important items on your to-do list. Even if you think your dog will never run away or get out of the backyard, it is better to be safe, rather than sorry.

ID tags make it significantly easier for your dog to make its way back home if they do manage break free. But what information should you include on this vital tag?

What You Should Include on Your Dog’s ID Tag

There are 2 vital pieces of information you should always include on your dog’s ID tag.

Dog’s Name

Your dog’s name is a big one to make sure is included. This allows the individual who finds your dog, the ability to comfort and speak with your dog by name, helping your dog to feel calmer and more trust with them. This makes it easier for the individual who finds your dog to read the second most vital piece of information… the phone number.

Phone Number

Your phone number is the second most vital piece of information to include on your dog’s ID tag. This allows the individual who finds your dog to contact you to set up arrangements to get your dog back home.

Other Information to Consider

Depending on the size of your dog’s Id tag, you may be able to include additional information about your dog or additional contact information. Here are some other items you may consider including on their tag.

Street Address

Including your street address allows the individual who finds your dog, to bring them directly to you. While this may be convenient in getting your dog home, it may not be the safest thing to do if you live alone.

Microchipped Status

Including whether your dog is microchipped or not, is a good way to let the individual who finds your dog, know there is a way to find out more information about where they belong. By bringing your microchipped dog to the nearest animal shelter, they can have their chip scanned to find exactly where and to whom they belong.

QR Codes

QR codes are becoming more and more popular and are a great way to provide a lot of information without taking up a lot of space. This allows the individual who finds your dog to scan the tag with their phone, to find out more information about your dog and yourself. This makes it easier for them to care for your dog while in their possession, and making it easier to get them back to you.

Behavioral Traits

Behavioral traits can be a good thing to include to help make the individual who finds your dog know how to manage your dog. Including traits like, “Good with Kids”, or “Doesn’t like Cats”, lets the individual know if they should keep your dog in a neutral area or not while trying to contact you.

 

The more information you can give about your dog and where they belong, the better chance they have of making it home. Remember the 2 most important ones, your dog’s name, and your phone number.